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Medicine and Your DNA

Learn about the genes that the All of Us Research Program looks at to give you results about how your DNA may affect how your body processes medicine.

DNA

Some genetic variants, or differences in your DNA, cause your body to process a medicine more slowly than the average person. This may mean that you need less of a medicine or that it stays in your body longer. Other variants cause your body to process a medicine faster. That may mean you need a larger dose or that it leaves your body faster.

All of Us can give you a report on the genes listed below. These genes are known to affect how the body processes medicine. We call this your Medicine and Your DNA report. For each gene, we will let you know which variant type you have and what that means. We will also include a list of medicines that may be affected by your genetics.

It is important to remember that your results from All of Us are research results. Before using these results in your care, they will need to be confirmed with a clinical test. Genetics alone does not determine whether a medicine is appropriate for someone. Weight, health, diet, and other medicines can affect how the body processes medicine.

Always talk to your doctor or health care provider before making any changes. Changing medicines or dosage on your own could be harmful to your health.

As our scientific knowledge of genes increases, the list of genes and associated medicines we look at might change in the future.

Medicine and Your DNA Report Gene List

Gene Drug interactions considered
CYP2C19
  • amitriptyline (Elavil®)
  • citalopram (Celexa®)
  • clobazam (Onfi®)
  • clomipramine (Anafranil®)
  • clopidogrel (Plavix®)
  • doxepin (Sinequan®)
  • escitalopram (Lexapro®)
  • imipramine (Tofranil®)
  • sertraline (Zoloft®)
  • trimipramine (Surmontil®)
  • voriconazole (Vfend®)
DPYD
  • capecitabine (Xeloda®)
  • fluorouracil (Adrucil®)
G6PD
  • chloramphenicol
  • dabrafenib (Tafinlar®)
  • dapsone
  • hydroxychloroquine (Plaquenil®)
  • local anesthetic-containing drugs (e.g. articaine, chloroprocaine, lidocaine, mepivacaine, ropivacaine, tetracaine)
  • mafenide (Sulfamylon®)
  • methylene blue
  • nalidixic acid (NegGram®)
  • nitrofurantoin (Macrobid®, Macrodantin®, Furadentin®)
  • pegloticase (Krystexxa®)
  • phenazopyridine
  • primaquine
  • probenecid (Col-Benemid®)
  • rasburicase (Elitek®)
  • sodium nitrite
  • sulfacetamide
  • sulfamethoxazole/trimethoprim (Bactrim®, Septra®)
  • sulfanilamide
  • sulfasalazine (Azulfidine®)
  • Sulfonylurea drugs [chlorpropamide (Diabinese®), glimepiride (Amaryl®), glipizide (Glucotrol®), glyburide (Diabeta®), tolazamide (Tolinase®), tolbutamide (Orinase®)]
  • tafenoquine (Krintafel®)
NUDT15
  • azathioprine (Imuran®)
  • mercaptopurine (Purinethol®)
  • thioguanine
SLCO1B1
  • simvastatin (Zocor®)
TPMT
  • azathioprine (Imuran®)
  • mercaptopurine (Purinethol®)
  • thioguanine
UGT1A1
  • atazanavir (Reyataz®)
  • belinostat (Beleodaq®)
  • irinotecan (Camptosar®)